Team of Scientists Observe Electron Scattering from Radioisotopes that Do Not Occur Naturally

0
164
Team of Scientists Observe Electron Scattering from Radioisotopes that Do Not Occur Naturally
Img Cr. phys.org

A team of chemists and physicists with members from Kyoto University, the Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Rikkyo University and Tohoku University, all in Japan, have for the first time observed electron scattering from radioisotopes that do not occur naturally. The isotopes were created in the laboratory using nuclear fusion reactions.

The team’s findings, published in the journal Nature, could help scientists to better understand the structure and properties of these isotopes, which are of interest for a variety of applications, including nuclear medicine and astrophysics.

Radioisotopes are unstable atoms that emit radiation. They can be created in nature, but they can also be created in the laboratory. The isotopes that the team studied were created by fusing two lighter atoms together in a nuclear reactor.

The team used a technique called electron scattering to study the structure of the isotopes. In electron scattering, electrons are fired at an atom and the way that the electrons scatter is used to determine the structure of the atom.

The team found that the isotopes that they studied had a different structure than natural isotopes. This is because the nuclear fusion reaction that created the isotopes also changed the structure of the atoms.

The team’s findings could help scientists to better understand the structure and properties of these isotopes. This knowledge could be used to develop new applications for these isotopes, such as in nuclear medicine or astrophysics.

Here are some additional details about the team’s findings:

  • The team studied two isotopes of molybdenum: molybdenum-97 and molybdenum-98.
  • These isotopes are unstable and decay into other elements over time.
  • The team used a technique called electron scattering to study the structure of the isotopes.
  • Electron scattering is a technique that uses electrons to probe the structure of atoms.
  • The team found that the isotopes that they studied had a different structure than natural isotopes.
  • This is because the nuclear fusion reaction that created the isotopes also changed the structure of the atoms.
  • The team’s findings could help scientists to better understand the structure and properties of these isotopes.
  • This knowledge could be used to develop new applications for these isotopes, such as in nuclear medicine or astrophysics.

The team’s findings are a significant step forward in the study of radioisotopes. They could lead to new applications for these isotopes in a variety of fields.

Leave a reply

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here